Multilingual Poetry from Shakespeare Outwards (Transreading)

Multilingual Poetry from Shakespeare Outwards (Transreading)

Explore the transgressive practices of Multilingual Poetry, taking inspiration from Shakespeare to contemporary writers, to resist monoculturalism!

This course explores a range of approaches within the exciting field of Multilingual Poetry. Here the emphasis will be writing through different languages and types of language, both official and unofficial, known and unknown, and to incorporate foreign, residual or emergent language sources in new work. Students will be given a detailed introduction to the various strategies within Multilingual Poetry and will become conversant with both Renaissance and contemporary exponents including Caroline Bergvall, Jasmina Bolfek-Radovani, Geoffrey Chaucer, Thomas Dekker, Jennifer K. Dick, Sophie Herxheimer, Peter Hughes, Maria Jastrzębska, Lisa Kiew, R.F. Langley, Hari Marini, Cia Renne, William Shakespeare, etc. Students will also develop an understanding of the dynamic nature of the English language, the role of etymology, precision, vernacular, the exile, and disruptive poetic practice.

Shakespeare will be the starting point for a series of forays into this generative and multiple world of language acts. Multilingual Poetry occupies transgressive poetic space enabling it to probe different types of language and how it is used. Forgotten and new words, borders, gender, migration, mistranslation, disruption, multicultural experience, and a degree of humour mixed with a spirit of ribaldry are all implicated within a resistance of monoculturalism.

5 fortnightly sessions over 10 weeks. No live chats. Suitable for UK & International students.

More information about how all our online courses work can be found on the Online Courses page.

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About David Caddy View Profile

David Caddy is a writer, critic, editor and poetry mentor. He has published books of poetry, essays and travel writing. He has edited the independent international literary journal, Tears in the Fence since 1984. His most recent books include The Bunny Poems (Shearsman Books), So Here We Are: Essays on English Poetry (Shearsman Books) and Cycling After Thomas And The English (Spout Hill Press). He was the co-author of London: City of Words (Blue Island) with Westrow Cooper, and has worked as a literary and editorial advisor for various organisations.

He leads an online poetry workshop, a mentoring and critical service, teaches writing at Bryanston School, and has directed the annual Tears in the Festival since 2011. From 1985 to 2001 he organised the East Street Poets, the UK’s largest rural poetry group, presenting poetry readings, workshops, residential writing weekends, educational visits and the annual Wessex Poetry Festival.

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